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How Mason Faculty Contributes to the Community

Posted: August 20, 2014

KSMITHHeadshotBy Kersten, a Mason Representative

For those of us who work at Mason, it is no surprise that we have some of the best faculty in the nation.  If you’re considering George Mason University, you should think about taking a class with one of our award winning faculty members.  Not only are our faculty members award winning teachers and researchers, but they are also making an impact in local and even global communities.  Being a part of the Mason Nation means that your experience can truly impact those around you.

imageJust recently a number of our professors have been recognized for their outstanding work.  R. Kevin Mallinson, an expert in the field of HIV and AIDS treatment, is a Mason professor that is building global relationships and encouraging current Mason graduate students to study in Africa.  Just recently, a graduate student from Mason’s Department of Global and Community Health traveled to Swaziland to work in local hospitals.  In the future, many Mason Nursing students as well as other Community Health students will be able to work in the hospitals that Mallinson has established relationships with.

"Tysons Corner "Early Bird" installation"George Mason University’s College of Visual and Performing Arts is home to outstanding faculty.  This month, Peter Winant, the director of the School of Art, and Tom Ashcraft, the lead professor of the school’s sculpture program, created “Early Bird”, a 3-D art installation in the brand new Plaza at Tysons Corner Center.  This installation will be seen by thousands of commuters at the brand new Metro Silver Line station in Tysons Corner.  The real estate investment trust that owns Tysons Corner Center specifically approached these Mason faculty to create a public artwork in the new area.  Throughout the creation process, Winant and Ashcraft consulted with undergraduate assistants to complete the project.  Mason students have life changing, hands-on experiences because of the professors they study under.  It’s humbling that George Mason University will now forever be a small part of the Metro Silver Line.

image (5)If you’re interested in pursuing History, you should take advantage of the opportunity to study under Marion Deshmukh.  Deshmukh is the co-curator of “Postcards from the Trenches: Germans and Americans Visualize the Great War”, an exhibition at the Pepco Edison Place Gallery in Washington, D.C.  This exhibition features original postcards from a WWI soldier who painted varied scenes of military life instead of writing extensive notes back home, and the postcards are unique and important because they weren’t censored like written postcards would be.  Through painting and drawing, soldiers could describe what was happening in the war zones to their families back home.  Learning from professors with first-hand experience in the curating world is something that most students don’t have the chance to experience, but here at Mason, you will find that you have many professional connections in important places.

image (7)Cing-Dao Kan, the director of Mason’s new Center for Collision Safety and Analysis, and other Mason students have been working hard to improve transportation safety.  In May 2014 the center was awarded an $8.5 million award from the U.S. Department of Transportation.  At the center, students are able to simulate car crashes with walls, guardrails, and trees.  The Center for Collision Safety and Analysis is a great place to learn more about engineering, computer science, statistics, and physics!

Whether you’re interested in public health, nursing, art, history, engineering, or any of the other majors that Mason offers, you will be supported by an outstanding team of faculty and staff that put their students first and often include students in their award-winning work.  For more faculty and staff news, check out the George Mason University News Desk website.

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Tips for Applying for a University Job

Posted: August 19, 2014, Last Updated: August 18, 2014

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By Sarah, a Patriot Blogger

Hey guys, Sarah here!  I recently wrote a guest article called “What to Expect at Mason Orientation” and I’m pleased to say that I’ve now become an official Patriot Blogger.  Fun times.  :)

So, let’s talk about jobs.  There’s no way around it – college is expensive.  Many students try to work part-time in school to offset some of the expenses, and I’m one of the lucky ones who managed to snag a great on-campus job.  Several people have asked me about how I got an on-campus job, and it’s true that it is a bit competitive.  But it’s not super difficult, as long as you’re determined and know a few tricks to up your chances.

Resume.

So I feel like this one is pretty straightforward, but I end up editing a lot of friends’ resumes to make them more streamlined.  The goal is to have all of your work experience listed in the most concise, compact format possible (ideally, your resume would be one page). Mason offers all sorts of student jobs, but desk jobs are the most common (Mason has a million offices). It’s a good idea tailor your resume to showcase any sort of administrative or secretary experience.

Online.

There are two main sites that most Mason students use.  HireMason (https://gmu-csm.symplicity.com/) is the primary site that students are referred to while job hunting.  After you create your profile, HireMason will send you email updates matching you up with jobs and internships you qualify for.  You can search for both on and off campus jobs and narrow down your search in several other ways.  You can also upload different resumes and cover letters and choose which ones you would like to send to each application. Another site I used while job hunting is Jobs at GMU (https://jobs.gmu.edu/).  This site was a little more user friendly in my opinion, and also gave me the option of uploading multiple resumes tailored individually toward the different jobs I applied for.  Check both of them out and get your resumes out there!

Visiting.

Visiting in person is always a good idea.  Many of the Mason offices I visited while job hunting thanked me but referred me to apply online (a pretty standard response).  But occasionally, you show up on that one lucky day when there happens to be an opening and they interview you on the spot because they don’t necessarily want to sift through hundreds of online applications.  So, in my opinion, it’s worth the time to try to apply in person.

Building connections.

This is another obvious one.  Try to connect with professors and other faculty members and tell your friends that you’re looking for work.  Your friends will tip you off if there are openings at their jobs, and your professors are often more than happy to write recommendations for you.

Persistence.

It can be hard to find time to hunt for jobs during all the craziness that comes along with classes, homework, and the rest of college life, so the sooner you start, the better!  If you’re an incoming freshman for the fall, I recommend writing up your resumes and creating your HireMason profile this summer.  And don’t be discouraged if you don’t have any luck initially. It’s true that the most popular time to hire student workers is at the beginning of each semester, but openings still appear throughout the year. Just keeping inquiring around and you’re bound to stumble upon something!

Special note for freshmen:

You’re in luck. Mason offices LOVE to hire freshmen. Here’s why: the training process can be pretty long for some of these jobs, and a lot of employers don’t want to keep training new people. So it makes sense that a first-year student would be an appealing employee – in most cases, they’ll be here for four years. This isn’t to say that upperclassmen don’t get on-campus jobs. This is just reassurance to freshmen that even if you don’t have a whole lot of job experience, there are plenty of other reasons for you to be considered for hiring, and your newness is one of them.

~~~~~

I work as part of the Welcome Team in the Office of Admissions and I can’t tell you how great it is to have an on-campus job here at Mason.  Not only do I have a reliable source of income throughout the school year (and summer), but I’ve become much more confident and knowledgeable since I communicate directly with applicants and visitors.  Many of the people who visit our office are high school students, incoming freshmen, and international students. My job can sometimes be confusing, but it’s also the most rewarding feeling in the world when students come for a tour and info session, ask about my personal experience as a Patriot, and then come back months later to say hi and that they’ve been accepted.

Moments like that make it totally worth it to have a job alongside homework and the rest of college life. But enough about me. Go get that Mason job.

Sarah

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I like to Move-In Move-In!

Posted: August 18, 2014

LuisaBy Luisa, a guest blogger

Your guide to packing for college.mason

So you’re moving into college, away from home. Gone are the days of readily available housekeeping services (a.k.a. mom and dad) and provided furniture. You are moving into a new living space, a space that provides, at most, a bed, a desk, and a closet, which means packing a TON of stuff. So where do you begin? Here are things you should be sure to pack…and some stuff you should leave behind.

 

chart- Sleeping: Sheets (twin extra-long fit on Mason beds), pillows, blankets, and an alarm clock!
– Study stuff: backpack, school supplies, scissors, post-it notes; whatever you need to stay organized in classes
– Hygiene: Toothbrush, toothpaste, all that stuff you use on a regular basis. Shower shoes are also a great idea, because now you are dealing with community showers.
– Cleanliness: Tissues, laundry detergent, iron, lint roller: all important for keeping you and your room clean and tidy.
– Fun stuff: sporting equipment, ipods, cameras, computers, speakers, everything you need to keep yourself happy and entertained!
– Decorations for the room: posters, special lighting, pictures, anything to help personalize your living space

Helpful Hints

– Coordinate with your roommate: you don’t want to deal with two fridges, two TVs, two ironing boards, etc. Space is limited, so save as much as you can by splitting the larger things between the two of you.
– Look online for floor plans of your dorm room at http://housing.gmu.edu/halls/
– Make a list of all the stuff you use on a day-to-day basis, and use that as your primary packing point.
– Start packing before the night before, or you WILL NOT FINISH!

Want specifics on what to pack? Check out these helpful sites online, or just Google “What to pack for college”

– George Mason Packing List: http://admissions.gmu.edu/documents/moveInChecklist.pdf
http://blog.thecollegeplanninggroup.com/2011/08/what-to-pack-for-college.html
- http://www.dormsmart.com/Dorm-Room-Checklist.html
- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HTAzQ4xuWMM
- http://www..com/2013/08/the-10-most-forgotten-things-when.html?m=1

Finally, if you do forget something, there’s always a Target and a Walmart nearby.

See you soon, and happy packing!

step brothers

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